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Thread: December 7th 1941 - Pearl Harbor

  1. #1
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    who would have guessed that the japan would rule the US economy 67 years later

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    My Uncle Jack always was a Navy man. He would tell me he was at Pearl Harbor this day but was in the Brig for acting up the night before. Did anyone else find the Pearl Harbor movie disturbing. I cried at the sight of those men dying in those ships. How horrifying it must have been for them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Forever-27 View Post
    who would have guessed that the japan would rule the US economy 67 years later
    How true. Great Post Mysterian.

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    There are so many stories of heroism on that day. So many men died trying to save others.
    Once in a million years a lady like her rises...

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    Here is a list of the civilians killed that tragic day.


    ADAMS, John Civilian
    ADAMS, Joseph Civilian
    AKANA, James Lum Civilian
    AKINA, August Civilian
    AKITAMA, George Jay Civilian
    ARAKAKI, Nancy Masako Civilian
    CAABAY, Benugno Civilian
    CARREIRA, John Civilian
    CHONG, Ernest Civilian
    CHONG, Patrick Kahamokupuni Civilian
    ELDRED, Phillip Ward Civilian
    FAUFATA, Matilda Kaliko Civilian
    FOSTER, Rowena K. Civilian
    FREEMAN, Theodore Civilian
    GONSALVES, Emma Civilian
    HARADA, Ai Civilian
    HATATE, Kisa Civilian
    HIGA, Masayoshi Fred Civilian
    HIRASAKI, Jackie Yoneto Civilian
    HIRASAKI, Jitsuo Civilian
    HIRASAKI, Robert Yoshito Civilian
    HIRASAKI, Shirley Kinue Civilian
    HOOKANO, Kamiko Civilian
    INAMINE, Paul S. Civilian
    IZUMI, Robert Seiko Civilian
    KAHOOKELE, David Civilian
    KIDA, Kiichi Civilian
    KIDA, Sutematsu Civilian
    KIMURA, Tomaso Civilian
    KIM, Soon Chip Civilian
    KONDO, Edward Koichi Civilian
    LA VERNE, Daniel Civilian
    LOO, Tai Chung Civilian
    LOPES, Peter Souza Civilian
    LUDICKE, Paul Civilian
    MACY, Thomas Samuel Civilian
    MCCABE, Joseph Civilian
    NAGAMINE, Masayoshi Civilian
    ODA, Yaeko Civilian
    OGAWA, Mataichi Civilian
    OHTA, Hayako Civilian
    OHTA, Jane Yuriko Civilian
    OHTA, Kiyoko Civilian
    OKADA, Kaichi Civilian
    OKOGI, Riyozo Civilian
    ORNELLAS, Barbara June Civilian
    ORNELLAS, Gertrude Civilian
    OSASHI, Frank Civilian
    PAIVA, Manuel Civilian
    PANG, Tuck Lee Civilian
    SOMA, Richard Masaru Civilian
    TACDERAN, Francisco Civilian
    TAKEFUJI, James Takao Civilian
    TOKUSATO, Yoshio Civilian
    TYCE, Robert H. Civilian
    UYEHARA, Kiho Civilian
    UYENO, Hisao Civilian
    WHITE, Alice Civilian
    WILSON, Eunice Civilian
    It's All Gravy Baby

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    I am a Navy girl and I salute all those who lost their lives that fateful day.....




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    My daughter was born today 28 years ago. She was due at Christmas time. We call her our sneak attack.

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    Quote Originally Posted by janel View Post
    My daughter was born today 28 years ago. She was due at Christmas time. We call her our sneak attack.

    How cute ......and HAPPY BIRTHDAY to her

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    How many of you out their had a relative who was in Pearl Harbor at that time.
    It's All Gravy Baby

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    Quote Originally Posted by janel View Post
    My daughter was born today 28 years ago. She was due at Christmas time. We call her our sneak attack.
    My son was born on this day 26 years ago. It's hard to believe I have a kid who is almost 30, LOL
    Defunct the strings, Of cemetery things
    With one flat foot.....On the devil's wing

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    Quote Originally Posted by eca1094 View Post
    How many of you out their had a relative who was in Pearl Harbor at that time.
    All my people were Army Air Corp....before there was an Air
    Force.......and none were at Pearl

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    My Mom's Uncle Joe Powers (who I am named for) was killed on the USS Helena.
    RIP Uncle Joe

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    It's a damn good thing that our Aircraft Carriers weren't there that day or we would have been in twice the mess and it would have taken alot longer to beat them.

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    It's also my dads B-day

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    Quote Originally Posted by STRAIGHT View Post
    It's a damn good thing that our Aircraft Carriers weren't there that day or we would have been in twice the mess and it would have taken alot longer to beat them.
    Exactly! I think the Japanese were counting on them being there, too...or should have.

    Nice avi!

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    On this day, 67 years ago, my grandparents married. They heard about the attack after they left the minister's house.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jlm709 View Post
    My Mom's Uncle Joe Powers (who I am named for) was killed on the USS Helena.
    RIP Uncle Joe
    My mom's uncle, Gilbert F. Dixon Fireman First Class, was killed on U.S.S. Longshaw, DD559. Longshaw was the only destroyer fatally hit by a Japanese land battery.

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    Quote Originally Posted by orionova View Post
    On this day, 67 years ago, my grandparents married. They heard about the attack after they left the minister's house.

    Wow....my mom was a wee lass, but she always told me she was at the general store ( yeah, I said general store ) and the propieter told her to hurry home and tell her folks to turn the radio on.....she said she was so scared because this man ( I forget his name ) was always so kind, but this moring he was crying......like a baby

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    I watched a show on tv this morning and it was very moving and powerful.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rickenbacker View Post
    Exactly! I think the Japanese were counting on them being there, too...or should have.

    Nice avi!
    Thanks, You too!

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    I had no people at Pearl Harbor (and for the record I thought the 2001 movie was a pile of fecal matter), however, one of my friends in high school was a fellow named Steve Vrana and Steve's dad Mr. Vrana (it wasn't until years later I learned he had a first name, Leo) was on the battleship California. In 2000 a local newspaper did a story on Pearl harbor featuring Mr. Vrana and another survivor, James Rabalais so I thought I would add a link for those interested in reading:
    http://www.caller2.com/2000/december..._ne/11413.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ima Sikfuk View Post
    I had no people at Pearl Harbor (and for the record I thought the 2001 movie was a pile of fecal matter), however, one of my friends in high school was a fellow named Steve Vrana and Steve's dad Mr. Vrana (it wasn't until years later I learned he had a first name, Leo) was on the battleship California. In 2000 a local newspaper did a story on Pearl harbor featuring Mr. Vrana and another survivor, James Rabalais so I thought I would add a link for those interested in reading:
    http://www.caller2.com/2000/december..._ne/11413.html
    Wonderful link Ima......thank you

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    My Uncle was stationed at "Pearl" Navy enlisted 1940,he was to be assigned to a ship that week instead,he became a body bare'r for a few weeks,his job removing bodies and parts of from the ships where they had been killed.He said it affected him greatly as being a 17 yr.old,he had never seen such carnage in his life.

  26. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Forever-27 View Post
    who would have guessed that the japan would rule the US economy 67 years later

    Yeah...we helped them build back their economy, and they listened too well! I remember when "made in Japan" meant that it was junk...

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    I know some who call Dec. 7th "Slap A Jap" Day.

    I'm just saying...

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    Thanks Mysterian for this thread...just thought I'd add that visiting the Pearl Harbor memorial (and the sunken battleship USS Arizona) in Honolulu is one of the most profoundly moving experiences I've ever had.
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    My dad was born and raised on the island of Kauai. He was only 5 years old at the time of pearl harbor but remembers bits and pieces of things. He said he remembers having to do the 'black outs' and he remembers the day the war ended. He said everyone was outside that night partying in the streets.

    The funny thing is that almost twenty years later my younger brother was born on Dec. 7, 1965.

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    Tomorrow marks the 68th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. There were many acts of bravery that day, as something of a history buff, felt it might be appropriate to recall some of the actions performed on that day.

    There were 15 Medals of Honor awarded for actions on that day, 10 were awarded posthumously. All recipients were Naval personnel and only one recipient was not stationed aboard a ship at the time.

    They were:
    Capt. Mervyn S. Bennion, 54, commanding officer of the battleship USS West Virginia, KIA.
    Ens. Francis C. Flaherty, 22, USNR, battleship USS Oklahoma, KIA.
    Ens. Herbert C. Jones, 23, battleship USS California, KIA.
    Rear Adm. Isaac Campbell Kidd, 57, commander Battleship Division I, flagship USS Arizona, KIA.
    CPO Thomas Reeves, 45, Chief Radioman, battleship USS California, KIA.
    Petty Officer 1st Class Robert Scott, 26, Machinist Mate 1st Class, battleship USS California, KIA.
    Chief Watertender Peter Tomich (nee Petar Tomić), 48, training/target ship USS Utah, KIA.
    Chief Boatswain Edwin Hill, 47, Chief Warrant Officer, battleship USS Nevada, KIA.
    Capt. Franklin Van Valkenburgh, 53, commanding officer, battleship USS Arizona, KIA.
    Seaman 1st Class James Richard Ward, 20, battleship USS Oklahoma, KIA.
    Lt. Commander Samuel Fuqua, 42, Damage Control Officer, USS Arizona.
    Gunner Jackson C. Pharris, 29, battleship USS California. Originally awarded the Navy Cross, his award was upgraded upon review in 1948.
    Warrant Officer Donald Kirby Ross, 30 (his 31st birthday was the day after the attack), Machinist, battleship USS Nevada.
    Commander Cassin Young, 47, commanding officer, repair ship USS Vestal. Young would be killed while serving as captain of the heavy cruiser USS San Francisco during the Guadalcanal naval battle.
    CPO John William Finn, 32, chief aviation ordnanceman, NAS Kaneohe Bay. Mr. Finn has the distinction of being the oldest living Medal of Honor recipient as well as the only surviving Pearl Harbor Medal of Honor recipient having recently celebrated his 100th birthday.

    The first shots of the battle were actually fired by a Wickes-class destroyer, the USS Ward, commanded by Capt. William Outerbridge. Ward, discovered, fired upon and sank a Japanese Ko-hyoteki-class midget submarine outside the entrance to Pearl a couple of hours before Japanese carrier-borne planes began their attack (long in doubt, the sinking was confirmed in 2002 when the sub was discovered about 5 miles from the entrance to the harbor in 1200 ft of water).

    In one of those odd twists of fate, in 1944 during the Leyte operations in the Philippines, Ward was struck and mortally wounded by a kamikaze plane. After Ward was abandoned and deemed unsalvageable, the destroyer USS O’Brien, was ordered to finish the job and sink Ward. The commanding officer of O’Brien? Capt. William Outerbridge.

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    Just looked up some of the ships that were at Pearl Harbor 12-7-1941.

    USS Arizona, sank, is now a memorial.
    USS Oklahoma, capsized, scrapped 1942.
    USS Nevada, sat in several feet of water for 2 months, repaired and returned to service May 1943, used as target for atomic testing 1946, sunk by the Navy 1948.
    USS Vestal, beached, repaired 1942, scrapped 1950.
    USS Tennessee, badly damaged, went in for repairs in, returned to service in May 1943.
    USS West Virginia, badly damaged, went in for repairs, returned to service in mid 1944, scrapped 1959.
    USS Maryland, went back into service February 1942, scrapped 1959.
    USS California, sank completely, raised March 1942, returned to service January 1944, scrapped 1959.
    All of these ships suffered loss of life, none as bad as the Arizona, or Oklahoma, but men died on them just the same.
    Many of these ships were build in 1912, 1914, 1916, and all were old when they were attacked, but they returned to the Pacific, many looked completely new, some looked the same, but they returned and gave the Japanese a major dose of "WHUP ASS"
    Can you imagine how the Japs felt when they saw the VERY SAME ships they'd bombed at Pearl Harbor BACK, and attacking them!
    Like the Phoenix, they rose up from not the ashes, but the ocean floor, and showed the Japanese what Americans are all about!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam View Post
    Just looked up some of the ships that were at Pearl Harbor 12-7-1941.

    USS Arizona, sank, is now a memorial.
    USS Oklahoma, capsized, scrapped 1942.
    USS Nevada, sat in several feet of water for 2 months, repaired and returned to service May 1943, used as target for atomic testing 1946, sunk by the Navy 1948.
    USS Vestal, beached, repaired 1942, scrapped 1950.
    USS Tennessee, badly damaged, went in for repairs in, returned to service in May 1943.
    USS West Virginia, badly damaged, went in for repairs, returned to service in mid 1944, scrapped 1959.
    USS Maryland, went back into service February 1942, scrapped 1959.
    USS California, sank completely, raised March 1942, returned to service January 1944, scrapped 1959.
    All of these ships suffered loss of life, none as bad as the Arizona, or Oklahoma, but men died on them just the same.
    Many of these ships were build in 1912, 1914, 1916, and all were old when they were attacked, but they returned to the Pacific, many looked completely new, some looked the same, but they returned and gave the Japanese a major dose of "WHUP ASS"
    Can you imagine how the Japs felt when they saw the VERY SAME ships they'd bombed at Pearl Harbor BACK, and attacking them!
    Like the Phoenix, they rose up from not the ashes, but the ocean floor, and showed the Japanese what Americans are all about!
    Beautifully said!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam View Post
    Just looked up some of the ships that were at Pearl Harbor 12-7-1941.

    ...

    USS Oklahoma, capsized, scrapped 1942.

    ...

    Like the Phoenix, they rose up from not the ashes, but the ocean floor, and showed the Japanese what Americans are all about!
    In 1943, the Oklahoma was righted and refloated into drydock, but due to a combination of obsolescence and poor condition, it was decided not to return the ship to service. In September 1944 the ship was decommissioned, and in 1946 was sold to a California scrapyard, but sank en route from Hawaii.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ima Sikfuk View Post

    They were:
    Capt. Mervyn S. Bennion, 54, commanding officer of the battleship USS West Virginia, KIA.
    Ens. Francis C. Flaherty, 22, USNR, battleship USS Oklahoma, KIA.
    Ens. Herbert C. Jones, 23, battleship USS California, KIA.
    Rear Adm. Isaac Campbell Kidd, 57, commander Battleship Division I, flagship USS Arizona, KIA.
    CPO Thomas Reeves, 45, Chief Radioman, battleship USS California, KIA.
    Petty Officer 1st Class Robert Scott, 26, Machinist Mate 1st Class, battleship USS California, KIA.
    Chief Watertender Peter Tomich (nee Petar Tomić), 48, training/target ship USS Utah, KIA.
    Chief Boatswain Edwin Hill, 47, Chief Warrant Officer, battleship USS Nevada, KIA.
    Capt. Franklin Van Valkenburgh, 53, commanding officer, battleship USS Arizona, KIA.
    Seaman 1st Class James Richard Ward, 20, battleship USS Oklahoma, KIA.
    Lt. Commander Samuel Fuqua, 42, Damage Control Officer, USS Arizona.
    Gunner Jackson C. Pharris, 29, battleship USS California. Originally awarded the Navy Cross, his award was upgraded upon review in 1948.
    Warrant Officer Donald Kirby Ross, 30 (his 31st birthday was the day after the attack), Machinist, battleship USS Nevada.
    Commander Cassin Young, 47, commanding officer, repair ship USS Vestal. Young would be killed while serving as captain of the heavy cruiser USS San Francisco during the Guadalcanal naval battle.
    CPO John William Finn, 32, chief aviation ordnanceman, NAS Kaneohe Bay. Mr. Finn has the distinction of being the oldest living Medal of Honor recipient as well as the only surviving Pearl Harbor Medal of Honor recipient having recently celebrated his 100th birthday.
    .
    Brave men all, no argument. Where is the black fellow that manned the gun?
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    Quote Originally Posted by neilmpenny View Post
    Brave men all, no argument. Where is the black fellow that manned the gun?


    Mess Attendant Doris Miller of the USS West Virgina, was first ordered to help remove the wounded Captain Bennion from the bridge. After Bennion refused to leave, Miller spied an unmanned .50 calibre anti-aircraft machine gun. Although he had never been trained on the weapon he manned the gun until he ran out of ammunition. All hands were soonafter ordered to abandon ship.

    Miller said afterwords, "It wasn't hard. I just pulled the trigger and she worked fine. I had watched the others with these guns. I guess I fired her for about fifteen minutes. I think I got one of those Jap planes. They were diving pretty close to us."

    For his action, Miller was awarded the Navy Cross, at the time the Navy's third highest honor, after the Medal of Honor and the Distinguished Service medal. Nowadays the Navy Cross is the second highest award for valor, ranking only behind the Medal of Honor. He was also promoted to Mess Attendent First Class, eventually reaching the rank of CPO, Officer's Cook 3rd Class.

    Miller was killed in action during the Battle of Tarawa while serving aboard the escort carrier USS Liscome Bay.
    Last edited by Ima Sikfuk; 12-07-2009 at 10:06 AM.

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    My brother in laws uncle was aboard the Arizona. He wasn't killed but was under water too long and was deprived of oxygen. He came out of it with the mentality of a 7yr old. It was such a shame to see him like that.

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    I don't whether this is true but...I've heard that the Allies knew exactly when the attack on Pearl Harbour would happen. Winston Churchill, the British Prime Minister, witheld that information from the Americans because he knew that a successful attack against them would compel the US to join the war effort, which they'd been reluctant to do prior to Dec. 7, 1941.
    Fuck Off. We're Full.

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    I heard Elvis paid to have the Arizona memorial
    built. Does anyone know if thats true?

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaylene View Post
    I heard Elvis paid to have the Arizona memorial
    built. Does anyone know if thats true?
    Not true, but in 1961 Elvis hosted a benefit concert at Pearl's Bloch Arena that according to National Park Service numbers, raised almost $55,000 for the memorial.

    Other sources of funding came from Hawai'i ($50,000). Around $95,000 was raised through a public fundraising effort kicked off by the television program This Is Your Life which had featured Medal of Honor recipient and senior surviving officer of the Arizona, Samuel Fuqua. The Revell Model Company in conjunction with the Fleet Reserve Association sold plastic models of the Arizona which included a donation form that helped raise another $40,000 or so. Federal funding to the tune of $150,000 was obtained by Hawai'ian Senator Daniel Inouye in 1961 to complete the project.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam View Post
    Just looked up some of the ships that were at Pearl Harbor 12-7-1941.

    USS Arizona, sank, is now a memorial.
    USS Oklahoma, capsized, scrapped 1942.
    USS Nevada, sat in several feet of water for 2 months, repaired and returned to service May 1943, used as target for atomic testing 1946, sunk by the Navy 1948.
    USS Vestal, beached, repaired 1942, scrapped 1950.
    USS Tennessee, badly damaged, went in for repairs in, returned to service in May 1943.
    USS West Virginia, badly damaged, went in for repairs, returned to service in mid 1944, scrapped 1959.
    USS Maryland, went back into service February 1942, scrapped 1959.
    USS California, sank completely, raised March 1942, returned to service January 1944, scrapped 1959.
    All of these ships suffered loss of life, none as bad as the Arizona, or Oklahoma, but men died on them just the same.
    Many of these ships were build in 1912, 1914, 1916, and all were old when they were attacked, but they returned to the Pacific, many looked completely new, some looked the same, but they returned and gave the Japanese a major dose of "WHUP ASS"
    Can you imagine how the Japs felt when they saw the VERY SAME ships they'd bombed at Pearl Harbor BACK, and attacking them!
    Like the Phoenix, they rose up from not the ashes, but the ocean floor, and showed the Japanese what Americans are all about!
    I believe the proper term is Nip.
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  41. #41
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    Tahnks for clearing that up for me. I always
    have wondered about if he did.

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    Quote Originally Posted by duster View Post
    I don't whether this is true but...I've heard that the Allies knew exactly when the attack on Pearl Harbour would happen. Winston Churchill, the British Prime Minister, witheld that information from the Americans because he knew that a successful attack against them would compel the US to join the war effort, which they'd been reluctant to do prior to Dec. 7, 1941.
    Actually I believe that there was a whole group who blamed FDR and said he knew in advance and allowed it to happen as a blame proof way to enter the war.
    There were lots of people who hated FDR and considered him a socialist and worse because of the New Deal and his unwavering support of labor.
    I personally don't think he knew this in advance any more than I think Bush knew about 9/11 in advance. I guess I have limits to my jaded views even for people I dislike as much as former President Bush.
    I also don't think that Churchill would have withheld the info if he knew it. There was nothing cowardly about that British Lion. I don't think he would have done it.
    I do know until the end of their lives in their 70s and 80s my mother and father could still not discuss Pearl Harbor with tears in their eyes.
    A quick how do explain this story. I worked with a gu whose Dad died on th Arizona when he was a baby.
    My friend took his family and teenage kids to Hawaii for the first time to visit the memorial.
    When they arrived he was dismayed to see the long list of names in no apparent order. He walked up the memorial and reached out his hand to touch the engraving and his hand out of all the names there landed on his Dad's name. I get chills just typing it now.
    I would like to think his Dad , emtombed below his feet just kind of reach out and sai I know your here son.
    Regards,
    Mary

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ima Sikfuk View Post


    Mess Attendant Doris Miller of the USS West Virgina, was first ordered to help remove the wounded Captain Bennion from the bridge. After Bennion refused to leave, Miller spied an unmanned .50 calibre anti-aircraft machine gun. Although he had never been trained on the weapon he manned the gun until he ran out of ammunition. All hands were soonafter ordered to abandon ship.

    Miller said afterwords, "It wasn't hard. I just pulled the trigger and she worked fine. I had watched the others with these guns. I guess I fired her for about fifteen minutes. I think I got one of those Jap planes. They were diving pretty close to us."

    For his action, Miller was awarded the Navy Cross, at the time the Navy's third highest honor, after the Medal of Honor and the Distinguished Service medal. Nowadays the Navy Cross is the second highest award for valor, ranking only behind the Medal of Honor. He was also promoted to Mess Attendent First Class, eventually reaching the rank of CPO, Officer's Cook 3rd Class.

    Miller was killed in action during the Battle of Tarawa while serving aboard the escort carrier USS Liscome Bay.
    There is a wonderful exhibit honoring Miller at the Texas Historical Museum in San Antonio at the UT. He was a native Texan and is still a legand to many in Texas.
    Regards,
    Mary

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    Quote Originally Posted by duster View Post
    I don't whether this is true but...I've heard that the Allies knew exactly when the attack on Pearl Harbour would happen. Winston Churchill, the British Prime Minister, witheld that information from the Americans because he knew that a successful attack against them would compel the US to join the war effort, which they'd been reluctant to do prior to Dec. 7, 1941.
    From: http://intellit.org/wwii_folder/wwii...earlintro.html

    A second conspiracy theory accuses British Prime Minister Winston Churchill of knowing that the Japanese fleet was on the way to attack Pearl Harbor but not warning Roosevelt. The reason suggested for Churchill's action was a belief that the America's joining with England was the only way that Hitler could be defeated. The central work in this category is probably James Rusbridger and Eric Nave, Betrayal at Pearl Harbor: How Churchill Lured Roosevelt into World War II (Old Tappan, NJ: Simon & Schuster, 1992). Rusbridger was a prolific -- and often sensationalist -- author on intelligence matters. Nave is regarded by some as the father of British codebreaking in the Far East. Based largely on Nave's memory decades after the fact, the book contends that both the British and the Dutch intercepted -- and read -- a radio signal sent to the Japanese carrier force on 25 November 1941. That message is supposed to have revealed the position and likely destination of the Japanese fleet. The authors assert that Churchill received this message -- and deliberately withheld it in order to ensure that the United States would be attacked and thereby brought into the war.

    The assertions in the Rusbridger and Nave book were greeted with some enthusiasm by the popular press, but were rejected almost universally by historians and intelligence experts. In the main, the book is based on hearsay and bits and pieces of information presented as evidence. The central argument in the book violates all that is known about the history of British and American cryptology. Briefly stated, the Japanese code that Rusbridger and Nave claim the message was sent in had not by all credible evidence -- and that evidence is voluminous -- been broken in 1941. In addition, the recently released minutes of the Joint Intelligence Committee (JIC) for 1941 do not support the revisionist suggestion that Churchill had and withheld foreknowledge of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. See Richard Aldrich, "British and American Policy on Intelligence Archives: Never-Never Land and Wonderland?" Studies in Intelligence 38, no. 5 (1995): 18

    To show that conspiracy theorists are committed to equal opportunity for friends and nonfriends alike, a third theory gives Stalin knowledge of the Japanese plans. Like Churchill, he is supposed to have so badly wanted the United States in the war against Hitler that he withheld that information from the Americans.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ima Sikfuk View Post


    Commander Cassin Young, 47, commanding officer, repair ship USS Vestal. Young would be killed while serving as captain of the heavy cruiser USS San Francisco during the Guadalcanal naval battle.
    .
    There was a destroyer rushed into service and commissioned the USS Cassion Young. It was highly decorated in service and is retired to the Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston next to the USS Constitution.
    I have stood on her deck and I recommend a visit to both ships if you are ever in the Boston area.
    http://www.nps.gov/bost/historycultu...assinyoung.htm
    We owe them all more than we can ever repay.
    Regards,
    Mary
    Attached Images Attached Images

  46. #46
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    Every Dec 7th here in Concord, CA the Beacon light on top of Mt Diablo is lit once a year in Remembrance of Pearl Harbor. All of the area Pearl Harbor Veterans meet at the top of the mountain and share memories of that fateful day.
    Needless to say there are less and less of them each year. Breaks my heart. My boss lets me off work each year to attend. This year is is cancelled because of the snow, but they are still going to make sure that Beacon Light is lit!



    Snow on Mount Diablo cancels Pearl Harbor remembrance at the summit

    By Elisabeth Nardi
    Contra Costa Times
    Posted: 12/07/2009 10:11:03 AM PST
    Updated: 12/07/2009 10:14:53 AM PST



    The unexpected snow atop Mt. Diablo, while beautiful, has marred a 46-year tradition.
    The Mount Diablo chapter of the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association has decided to cancel its summit Pearl Harbor remembrance ceremony today. Every year the group holds a ceremony and the beacon atop Mount Diablo is lit and stays blinking until sunrise the next day to honor those who died at Pearl Harbor.
    But even though the summit ceremony has been canceled due to this winter weather, the beacon will shine tonight, said Wayne Korsinen, an honorary member of the survivors group.
    "The beacon will be lit, even if they have to hike up there," said Korsinen Monday morning.
    Every year, survivors of Pearl Harbor and others have gathered to pay tribute to the more than 2,000 who died in, and those who survived, the Japanese attack in Hawaii on Dec. 7, 1941. Those who gather always light the beacon that was erected by Standard Oil in 1928 to help guide airplanes.
    While the ceremony at the summit is canceled, Korsinen said the group still plans to hold a roadside ceremony at a turnout on Northgate Road. Exactly where that will be has not been determined, but organizers are working on it this morning, Korsinen said. That quick ceremony will include Pearl Harbor survivors and will start around 3:15 p.m., he said.
    Last edited by Nicki; 12-07-2009 at 12:22 PM.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by STsFirstmate View Post
    There was a destroyer rushed into service and commissioned the USS Cassion Young. It was highly decorated in service and is retired to the Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston next to the USS Constitution.
    I have stood on her deck and I recommend a visit to both ships if you are ever in the Boston area.
    http://www.nps.gov/bost/historycultu...assinyoung.htm
    We owe them all more than we can ever repay.
    Regards,
    Mary
    Thanks for that post Mary.

    To me, Medal of Honor citations tend to be very dry accounts of the recipient's actions. I personally much prefer the anecdotal accounts and one of my favorites is that of Commander Young. Hope you don't mind a copy and paste from this website (http://www.homeofheroes.com/pearlharbor/pearl_5az.html ) the site has a midi that I find annoying and can't figure out how to shut it off.


    The repair ship Vestal was moored between the Arizona and Ford Island and had already been taking its own share of hits from the enemy bombs. Standing exposed on its deck was Commander Cassin Young, ordering resistance and seeking to organize his crew. The violence of the explosion on the USS Arizona was so intense more than 100 crewmen on the nearby Vestal were thrown into the air and hurled into the oil-covered waters of Pearl Harbor. Commander Cassin Young was among them.

    Immediate panic set it. The Vestal appeared to be done for with water flowing into the engine room from an earlier bomb hit. Bulkheads bowed and buckled inward. The ship's commander vaporized along with 100 others in the explosion that destroyed the Arizona and Japanese airplanes kept coming. In a last-ditch effort to save the crew the ship's executive officer issued the order to abandon.

    Men were streaming over the sides when an apparition clambered aboard. His uniform drenched with water and his entire body covered with oil, the figure presented an eerie sight standing completely exposed on the Vestal's gangplank. "Where the hell do you men think you are going?" shouted the voice of Commander Cassin Young. Unbelievably he not only survived the blast that hurtled him into the air but also the flaming waters of Pearl Harbor. Determinedly he swam back to save his ship. Looking down at the water, now filled with crewmen who were racing towards shore, he shouted, "Come back here! You're not going to abandon ship on me yet!" Then he strolled the litter-strewn deck, heedless of enemy strafing and bombardment. "All hands back to your battle stations and prepare to get under way," he shouted.

    Normal steam pressure for moving the Vestal was 250 pounds. Damaged pipes spewed hot steam into the air and only 50 pounds of pressure could be achieved. On this day, it was enough. Mooring lines to the doomed Arizona were cut and slowly, miraculously, the Vestal moved into open water under the fearless guidance of Commander Cassin Young. Two tugs were commandeered to help the stricken vessel continue its escape from the burning Arizona, but water continued to pour in and it was apparent that the Vestal was sinking. To prevent the loss, Commander Young ran his ship aground on a coral reef at Aiea. The Vestal would sail again, after some repair work, thanks to its fearless skipper's sheer guts and determination.

    Last edited by Ima Sikfuk; 12-07-2009 at 05:06 PM.

  48. #48
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    I was wondering how many WWII vets are still alive? Wiki answers are below,this is just American,anyone have any idea of the total number of Vets world wide?
    http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_many_W...re_alive_today

    “Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery.”

    Winston CXhruchill

  49. #49
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    Ima wow! What a guy and to think he continued his career on a fighting ship and lost his life while in command.
    If ever a guy evinced conspicuous gallentry it was this guy.
    Thank you for the additional information. They had an exhibit in Boston on the ship that told his story but I am embarassed to say I was way more interested in seeing the ship.
    Regards,
    Mary

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by MorbidMolly View Post




    If you look at that last photo and the name R. Patterson Jr.. That was my father's next door neighbor when he was a kid. I've been to the Arizona and saw this wall.

    wow...

    .

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