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Thread: Martin Luther King

  1. #51
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    Martin Luther King has become an untouchable figure, a secular diety. If you speak the truth about him you'll likely be called a racist or a "hater," it's the modern PC equivilent of crying "heritic!" But the actual facts of Martin Luther King's life are disturbing to anyone who cares to investigate them.

    Some of the most damning material on King comes from one of his closest allies, Rev. Ralph David Abernathy who was with him through the civil rights campaigns. Abernathy wrote a book in 1989 called And the Walls Came Tumbling Down that confirms many of the charges Alexandra has made here, so don't attack her for telling the truth. Abernathy's book is just one source, there are others.

    No mortal is above criticism, the only places on earth where men are elevated above scrutiny and criticism are dictatorships.
    Last edited by Taggerez; 01-18-2010 at 12:21 PM.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taggerez View Post
    Martin Luther King has become an untouchable figure, a secular diety. If you speak the truth about him you'll likely be called a racist or a "hater," it's the modern PC equivilent of crying "heritic!" But the actual facts of Martin Luther King's life are disturbing to anyone who cares to investigate them.

    Some of the most damning material on King comes from one of his closest allies, Rev. Ralph David Abernathy who was with him through the civil rights campaigns. Abernathy wrote a book in 1989 called And the Walls Came Tumbling Down that confirms many of the charges Alexandra has made here, so don't attack her for telling the truth. Abernathy's book is just one source, there are others.

    No mortal is above criticism, the only places on earth where men are elevated above scrutiny and criticism are dictatorships.
    Maybe I should read that book. I wasn't attacking Alexandra, just stating my opinion with what facts I know.
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  3. #53
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    Maybe I should read that book. I wasn't attacking Alexandra, just stating my opinion with what facts I know.
    I aqppreciate the attitude, cindyt. It's a fairly thick read, from what I remember.

  4. #54
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    I think MLK was one of the greatest men ever to have lived. The "I have a dream" speech sends tingles down my spine every time I hear it.

    I don't think the man was perfect.......but he believed in what he was saying and others wanted to believe too.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taggerez View Post
    I aqppreciate the attitude, cindyt. It's a fairly thick read, from what I remember.
    I'm open minded, and I'm not too proud to admit when I am or may be wrong.
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  6. #56
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    We had the largest MLK march in the country today here, unfortunately when it ended a 14 year old shot a 16 year old as the crowd was dispersing.
    A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ichabodius View Post
    We had the largest MLK march in the country today here, unfortunately when it ended a 14 year old shot a 16 year old as the crowd was dispersing.
    Jebus.
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  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taggerez View Post
    Martin Luther King has become an untouchable figure, a secular diety. If you speak the truth about him you'll likely be called a racist or a "hater," it's the modern PC equivilent of crying "heritic!" But the actual facts of Martin Luther King's life are disturbing to anyone who cares to investigate them.

    Some of the most damning material on King comes from one of his closest allies, Rev. Ralph David Abernathy who was with him through the civil rights campaigns. Abernathy wrote a book in 1989 called And the Walls Came Tumbling Down that confirms many of the charges Alexandra has made here, so don't attack her for telling the truth. Abernathy's book is just one source, there are others.

    No mortal is above criticism, the only places on earth where men are elevated above scrutiny and criticism are dictatorships.

    If you were referring to my post where I said there is always a "hater" in the bunch, then yes, I meant what I said. Most of the time people "hate" what they do not care to take time to understand. I am not naive enough to believe that Dr. King first and foremost was not a man by nature-I never believed he was Jesus. All I am saying is that I am tired of seeing people like him denigrated by certain elements on this board who if you read between the lines seem to have scorn for blacks and other racial groups. That attitude is blatantly obvious to me by some of the posts I have read in a lot of the threads on this board. And most of the time nothing is said or done. Just my .02.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by mstee2u1972 View Post
    If you were referring to my post where I said there is always a "hater" in the bunch, then yes, I meant what I said. Most of the time people "hate" what they do not care to take time to understand. I am not naive enough to believe that Dr. King first and foremost was not a man by nature-I never believed he was Jesus. All I am saying is that I am tired of seeing people like him denigrated by certain elements on this board who if you read between the lines seem to have scorn for blacks and other racial groups. That attitude is blatantly obvious to me by some of the posts I have read in a lot of the threads on this board. And most of the time nothing is said or done. Just my .02.
    I agree. I think its funny when someone joins the forum and only post in the threads about minorities, gays and non christian religions but claim they are just trying to clear up the truth. This is a entertainment forum, not a soapbox to spread propaganda

  10. #60
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    This is a entertainment forum, not a soapbox to spread propaganda
    I would assume that would go both ways. And, a forum is generally a market place of ideas, even those you may not like.

    Most of the time people "hate" what they do not care to take time to understand.
    Familiarity breeds contempt also.

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yvonne View Post
    I think MLK was one of the greatest men ever to have lived. The "I have a dream" speech sends tingles down my spine every time I hear it.

    I don't think the man was perfect.......but he believed in what he was saying and others wanted to believe too.
    I believe he did many great things. But even the Greatest, most Admirable man has his flaws. Haven't seen one that was perfect yet. I guess that goes to show us how human we all really are.

    This is the info I found.
    Previous Marriages:

    None. However, while at Crozer Seminary, Martin fell in love with a Caucasian woman.
    They talked about marriage, but after being warned of the difficulties of an interracial relationship and the possible negative impact on his career, they ended the relationship. King was described as a "man of a broken heart--he never recovered."
    Source: "Bearing the Cross", by David Garrow, pages 40-41, and Gale Group


    Martin's Alleged Extramarital Affairs:
    Since 1989, when Reverend Ralph Abernathy wrote about Martin's adulterous relationships, the question of whether or not Martin Luther King, Jr. was unfaithful to his wife or not is still being debated. A year before he died, Martin allegedly revealed a longstanding affair to Coretta. However, Coretta stated that she and Martin "never had one single serious discussion about either of us being involved with another person."
    Source: "I May Not Get There With You", by Michael Dyson, p. 216.

    King described his affairs as "a form of anxiety reduction." Martin said, "Iím away from home twenty-five to twenty-seven days a month." Three relationships were more than one-night stands, and Martin grew especially close to one woman. The "relationship, rather than his marriage, increasingly became the emotional centerpiece of King's life, but it did not eliminate the incidental couplings that were a commonplace of King's travels."
    Source: "Bearing the Cross", by David Garrow, p. 375.

    Ralph Abernathy: "Martin and I were away more often than we were at home; and while this was no excuse for extramarital relations, it was a reason. Some men are better able to bear such deprivations than others, though all of us in SCLC headquarters had our weak moments. We all understood and believed in the biblical prohibition against sex outside of marriage. It was just that he had a particularly difficult time with that temptation.
    Source: "And the Walls Came Tumbling Down" and Snopes

    http://marriage.about.com/od/politic...tincoretta.htm

  12. #62
    It's funny how this popped up right in the middle of my unit on social justice heroes with my 3rd graders. I'm currently teaching them about MLK, Cesar Chavez, and Susan B. Anthony. This has required that I do research and I too have read things about MLK and Chavez that I won't be teaching to my 3rd graders lol.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicki View Post
    I believe he did many great things. But even the Greatest, most Admirable man has his flaws. Haven't seen one that was perfect yet. I guess that goes to show us how human we all really are.

    This is the info I found.
    Previous Marriages:

    None. However, while at Crozer Seminary, Martin fell in love with a Caucasian woman.
    They talked about marriage, but after being warned of the difficulties of an interracial relationship and the possible negative impact on his career, they ended the relationship. King was described as a "man of a broken heart--he never recovered."
    Source: "Bearing the Cross", by David Garrow, pages 40-41, and Gale Group


    Martin's Alleged Extramarital Affairs:
    Since 1989, when Reverend Ralph Abernathy wrote about Martin's adulterous relationships, the question of whether or not Martin Luther King, Jr. was unfaithful to his wife or not is still being debated. A year before he died, Martin allegedly revealed a longstanding affair to Coretta. However, Coretta stated that she and Martin "never had one single serious discussion about either of us being involved with another person."
    Source: "I May Not Get There With You", by Michael Dyson, p. 216.
    King described his affairs as "a form of anxiety reduction." Martin said, "Iím away from home twenty-five to twenty-seven days a month." Three relationships were more than one-night stands, and Martin grew especially close to one woman. The "relationship, rather than his marriage, increasingly became the emotional centerpiece of King's life, but it did not eliminate the incidental couplings that were a commonplace of King's travels."
    Source: "Bearing the Cross", by David Garrow, p. 375.
    Ralph Abernathy: "Martin and I were away more often than we were at home; and while this was no excuse for extramarital relations, it was a reason. Some men are better able to bear such deprivations than others, though all of us in SCLC headquarters had our weak moments. We all understood and believed in the biblical prohibition against sex outside of marriage. It was just that he had a particularly difficult time with that temptation.
    Source: "And the Walls Came Tumbling Down" and Snopes

    http://marriage.about.com/od/politic...tincoretta.htm
    Georgia Davis Powers was the woman MLK had a long affair with. They spent the night of April 3/68 together - so much for making it to heaven

  14. #64
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    Bump.
    A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another.

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    Wow. 100,000 participants in the march here in San Antonio:
    http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/loc...000-961696.php
    A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another.

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    I can overlook just about anything they dredge up about him, for the sheer fact that he had a gigantic impact on equality. Look at Kennedy. Everyone thinks he was a Messiah. Especially here in Boston. I think he brought this country together, as MLK did, so I can overlook the stuff he did outside of the public eye.

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    The NAACP had a MLK Observance Celebration at the Statehouse in Columbia, SC. The NAACP constructed a "box" to conceal the "Father of The Country" from view so that participants would not be offended by his presence.

    Seems like an awful lot of trouble - And for what?

    sigh
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    OMG! I lived in Memphis when this happened. I was 10. We saw it on the news and my mother said "It's about time!" That was wrong and will stick with me for the rest of my life. Anyway, I remember going out on the porch with my Dad and looking towards town. You could see the smoke from the riots. I remember that my mother came outside and told us that we couldn't be outside, we were under curfew. I was so scared. I had a big "play house" outside (the storage room) and all my dolls were in it. I couldn't get them and I was so scared for them too. It's funny how things affect us. When I think of MLK now, it's with fear at first. Then I think of everything this country learned from him and have much respect for him.
    Last edited by DonnaMc; 03-11-2011 at 06:04 PM.
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    RIP Dr. King. One of my heroes. What an intelligent and brave man. God bless you always and to all those who lost their lives fighting, in a nonviolent way, for justice, peace and equality.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GuiltyLittleDeathHag View Post
    RIP Dr. King. One of my heroes. What an intelligent and brave man. God bless you always and to all those who lost their lives fighting, in a nonviolent way, for justice, peace and equality.
    I agree DLGH ... I'm so happy I was brought up in a family that didn't use disparaging remarks about others. Because my father was an Army officer and the military is so diverse, I never heard any bad words. Geesh... I had to go to school to first hear the "N" word and I hated it ever since! It's so aweful and derogatory and hateful.
    Dr. King was a true hero in America.
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    Okay Im, I didn't mean I felt the same way my mother did. I tried to say that all my early memories of MLK were of fear until I was old enough to know what he was fighting for. I respect MLK.
    The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DonnaMc View Post
    Okay Im, I didn't mean I felt the same way my mother did. I tried to say that all my early memories of MLK were of fear until I was old enough to know what he was fighting for. I respect MLK.
    What was the fear? That blacks would have a voting right? That they wanted their ability to be Americans?
    I had no fear about that. If you're brought up know that, they were trying to have "equal rights" .... the entire south were freaked out about it!
    That's why JFK passed the voting rights act for Blacks.
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    The fear was riots, murder, and confusion. (Of course shortly thereafter, we moved to Mississippi). My parents freaked out, so thus the confusion. They wonder how I turned out like I did - NOT like them!
    The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.

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    I understand. It was all set off by Alabama and Missisppi because many people from the north (yankees I guess they'd be called) were coming down and doing voting rights petitions for black americans. Here is an apology from then Governor George Wallace about his decisions.

    http://findarticles.com/p/articles/m...0/ai_18808442/

    There is a lyric from the film "South Pacific" about hate .... "you've got to be taught from year to year, it's got to be drummed in your dear little ear, you've got to be carefully taught".

    You beat it Donna girl!
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    That was a heartwarming article. The movement has come a long way in just 40+ years!
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    MLK died 43 years ago today. RIP Mr. King. Your dream still lives on.
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    One of the great figures of courage and rightous action in my opinion. Flawed though he was it made him all the more human and relatable.
    RIP Doctor King and Ms. Coretta.
    regards,
    Mary

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    RIP Mr. King
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    Rest in peace, Dr. King. Your flaws only served to make you more human, and your work all the greater.

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    Early morning, April 4
    Shot rings out in the Memphis sky
    Free at last, they took your life
    They could not take your pride

    In the name of Love
    What more in the name of Love?

    U2
    Pride (In the Name of Love)

    Remembering you today and always, Dr. King. Thank You for all that you've done for our country. May you Forever Rest in Peace.

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    R.I.P. Dr. King. You were the bravest man I ever met. Thank you for teacing a lot of us white people lessons we weren't getting at home or in our church's. I admire you more than any other person in our history.

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    Out of the mountain of despair, a stone of hope







    MLK Jr. Memorial preview: The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington,


    In the nation's capital, on the banks of the Tidal Basin, a new memorial opened Monday -- one that many believed might never come.
    A 30-foot-tall vision of a resolute Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., rising from a block of granite, peering across the peaceful waters toward the neoclassical pillars and dome of the Jefferson Memorial. Behind him, across Independence Avenue, stands the Lincoln Memorial -- the site of the slain civil rights leader's most famous speech 48 years ago.
    "I think it's beautiful -- just as beautiful as the Lincoln or the Jefferson or any other memorials," said Renee Robinson, 49, of Washington, D.C. "It makes you think there's hope out here."
    Hundreds of thousands are expected for the memorial's formal dedication Sunday.
    Nineteen-year-old Melissa Frohman of Maryland -- she will be a sophomore at the [SIZE=5]University[/SIZE] of Michigan this fall -- proclaimed it "really cool."
    "It's very important," she said, "and it's definitely been a long time coming."


    MLK Jr. Memorial preview: The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C. is open for a few days before it's unveiling August 28.








    The Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial is seen ahead of its dedication this weekend in Washington, Monday, Aug. 22, 2011.
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  35. #85
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    I think for the money it cost they could have made a better likeness of him for the memorial. His sttatue was dedicated yesterday in DC on the national mall. He faces the Jefferson Memorial
    Last edited by Forever-27; 10-17-2011 at 08:15 AM.

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    Not that this is something to brag about but my mother's childhood friend and I were talking and she told me that she lived down the street from where MLK Jr was shot. She heard the shots.

    I'd like to see his memorial in D.C. I haven't been to D.C. since 2000.
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  37. #87
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    Caught this pictures today.. Some are graphic. http://news.yahoo.com/photos/life-th...333554030.html


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    Thanks for sharing, Miho!
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    Those are some interesting photos. I just reread the last page of this thread, and while I refuse to touch the issue of race (i'm still iritated from the Trayvon thread), I would like to make an observation.

    There is ample proof out there that MLK whored around outside his marriage, and used some not so nice tactics. Certain government agencies even tried to defame him using photographic proof, but found the press reluctant to print it. So in many ways he was a jerk, but does that completely invalidate the work he did? Had he been subject to a press core devoid of the honour code they had in his day, to 24/7 coverage, to the "need to know" we have? Would he have been able to succeed? Or would he have been silenced by the outcry over his personal behavior? I think the latter.

    The truth is virtually no public figure is above reproach now or in the past. JFK is virtually deified in many circles, when it's perfectly clear to anyone aware of his background that he was a philanderer, somewhat of a fame whore, and motivated less by his own ideals than his father's ambition. Still, he accomplished good things. Recognizing flaws in a historical figure doesn't have to take away from their accomplishments. And if you're looking to tarnish someone's name using their personal life as ammo because you don't like what they've accomplished, then you're no better than your enemy.

    And maybe we got a lot more done when we weren't looking in people's bedrooms.
    Last edited by radiojane; 04-04-2012 at 02:37 PM.
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    It 'was the greatest. Learned about him in the second category .. while living in a small town with no people of color (up to now, things have changed now). It 'was one of the greatest lessons I ever had in school. It 's definitely one of my heroes.
    .

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    "I will be buried in a spring loaded casket filled with confetti, and a future archaeologist will have one awesome day at work."

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    Quote Originally Posted by radiojane View Post
    There is ample proof out there that MLK whored around outside his marriage, and used some not so nice tactics.
    People seeking a goal greater than themselves (or even greedy personal goals) often use not so nice tactics - you have to because you are met with the same at every turn; so you learn to "play" by the rules.

    As for the alleged personal indescretions that seem to be plausible; judgement over that should be between he and his wife; not the general public; unless there were crimes (children) involved.

    It seems (I gather) that to him; it wasn't "all about him"; the work that he did. Compare him to his friend Jesse who just seems to try to keep himself in the news.

    I grew up in Mississippi during the 60's with parents who believed in "separate but equal"; but I noticed at an early age that there were different degrees of equal.

    I remember public drinking fountains side by side, one labled "Whites"; the other labeled "Coloreds"; I think one of those still stands in my old hometown in front of the Courthouse not as a "monument to the past"; but as a reminder of how segregated we used to be and are not so much today.

    As if Black folks and White folks can somehow get different kind of "cooties" by drinking water from the same fountains behind each other.

    One of my more perplexing memories as a child was seeing a public laundry with a sign over the door that said "Whites Only".

    This was in the age of TV commercials that screamed, "Cheer detergent gets your whites whiter than white!"

    I thought that meant that you could only wash white stuff in there; until my father explained that only white people could wash stuff in there.

    I was raised to respect my elders; yet when I called an older Black guy "Sir"; I was met with disapproving nods of the head.

    Damn, was I confused about all of this; but it (I was) was just a product of the times.

    You'll encounter bigots wherever you go; New York or here in South MS; there are no boundaries for bigotry
    Throwing feces.

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  43. #93
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    Here is a fun Martin Luther King Jr. day quiz. There are some hard questions in here. I only got 12 of them correct. Anyone know what Mr. King won a Grammy for? I had no idea.

    http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/2013/01...-King-Jr.-born

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    Dr. King pushed humanity; such as we are; into it's next logical level of acceptance for the disenfranchised.

    Huge job that; he succeeded.
    Throwing feces.

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    Once again a day of peace turns violent as 5 young people were shot along the parade route on MLK day. Do kids today have any heroes or any kind of respect? Do they understand or even care about what he stood for? Sadly, these were all young black men that were involved in these shootings and the older black people in the neighborhood where it happened were just heartbroken, some in tears because they remember Dr. King and what he tried to instill in all of us. This is just so sad.

    (We are in the middle of Mardi Gras season and will host the Super Bowl in two weeks. If anyone knows anyone coming down here, tell them to be careful and watch out for scams artists)
    "Never lie, steal or cheat...but if you must lie, then lie beside me all the nights of your life. If you must steal, then steal away my sorrows. And if you must cheat, then cheat death because I could not imagine a day without you by my side."

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    Quote Originally Posted by coconn04 View Post
    Out of the mountain of despair, a stone of hope







    MLK Jr. Memorial preview: The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington,


    In the nation's capital, on the banks of the Tidal Basin, a new memorial opened Monday -- one that many believed might never come.
    A 30-foot-tall vision of a resolute Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., rising from a block of granite, peering across the peaceful waters toward the neoclassical pillars and dome of the Jefferson Memorial. Behind him, across Independence Avenue, stands the Lincoln Memorial -- the site of the slain civil rights leader's most famous speech 48 years ago.
    "I think it's beautiful -- just as beautiful as the Lincoln or the Jefferson or any other memorials," said Renee Robinson, 49, of Washington, D.C. "It makes you think there's hope out here."
    Hundreds of thousands are expected for the memorial's formal dedication Sunday.
    Nineteen-year-old Melissa Frohman of Maryland -- she will be a sophomore at the [SIZE=5]University[/SIZE] of Michigan this fall -- proclaimed it "really cool."
    "It's very important," she said, "and it's definitely been a long time coming."


    MLK Jr. Memorial preview: The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C. is open for a few days before it's unveiling August 28.








    The Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial is seen ahead of its dedication this weekend in Washington, Monday, Aug. 22, 2011.
    About time.
    .

    Life goes on.

  47. #97
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Georgia
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    1,257
    Quote Originally Posted by MiraculousMandarin View Post
    Here is a fun Martin Luther King Jr. day quiz. There are some hard questions in here. I only got 12 of them correct. Anyone know what Mr. King won a Grammy for? I had no idea.

    http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/2013/01...-King-Jr.-born
    I got 17! I surprised myself. And according to the Grammy database, Dr King won in 1970 for Best Spoken Word recording, for "Why I Oppose the War in Viet Nam".

  48. #98
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    Nov 2008
    Location
    Kirkland, WA
    Posts
    1,348
    Quote Originally Posted by madeline View Post
    I got 17! I surprised myself. And according to the Grammy database, Dr King won in 1970 for Best Spoken Word recording, for "Why I Oppose the War in Viet Nam".
    18 ... not bad for an undesirable alien.

    The Congressional Medal of Honor is reserved for heroic servicemen (who often are killed in the process), so that seemed the logical choice of elimination for the 'Grammy' question.

  49. #99
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Houston Texas,USA
    Posts
    81
    I remember asking my Mom, Why would someone do that. She awnsered some people have other view than we do. I ate my cookies & milk. Went into the back yard and played.
    It's a good day when you open your eyes, and the celling is not stainless steel.

  50. #100
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    5,452
    Dr. King was and is a "role model".

    We have private lives and we have public lives and the two do not always mirror each other.

    One does not negate the other, IMO.

    Dr. King had a much bigger public life than most of us could ever understand; yet there was still his life as a man.

    Maybe he was guilty of "sins" in his personal life that he did not want portrayed in his public persona.

    I'm guilty of that on a smaller scale.

    Are any of you?

    In the 1960's in America; how far do you think the movement for equal rights would have come if Dr. King had gone around shouting, "I have a problem!"; instead of saying, "I have a dream."?

    He was still just a man; possibly with our shared weaknesses; but a role model none the less; and possibly the only American Martyr that I can name.

    RIP, Dr. King; thank you for your efforts and your sacrifice.

    We need a lot more people like you.
    Throwing feces.

    Just. Don't. Do. It.

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