Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: Jacquelyn Helton, "Sunshine"

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2,092

    Jacquelyn Helton, "Sunshine"

    The recent thread about "Trinidad", the cancer-stricken girl who fatally delayed treatment for the sake of her pregnancy, brought this lady back to my mind, almost 40 years after her untimely death.

    Many of a certain age (including of course myself) will remember the heyday of made-for-TV movies back in the early 1970s. Some of these movies explored some formerly taboo topics in an edgy attempt at pushing the envelope of the G-rated format, and some were about young cancer victims. One of the most memorable and, in some opinions, among the best of these--- right up there with BRIAN'S SONG--- was the story of a young doomed mother who gained a brief fame for recording her thoughts for her then-toddler daughter. This was based on a series of articles, and then a book, SUNSHINE, written shortly before and after her death in 1971.

    Jacquelyn "Lynn" Marie Helton (one thing I can't find is her maiden name, and it's been years since I read or even saw the book) was a teenaged bride who gave birth to her only child, Jennifer, in 1969 at age 18. Soon after, she and her first husband parted, and she quickly met, fell in love with, and married a young musician named Tom Helton, who also adopted her daughter.
    During this period, Jacquelyn had received the terrible news that she had a rare form of bone cancer. She and her new husband had been living in Wyoming, where they both performed with a local band, The Lowe Brothers, that was gaining some notice. Her condition forced them to move to Denver, Colorado to be near the best treatment center at the time.

    She was offered the option of amputation of one of her legs to halt the cancer's spread, but there were no guarantees, and she was reluctant to become so mutilated and helpless, if it might be futile anyway. Other treatments were tried, but she suffered greatly, as cancer patients still suffer, and often die today.

    At that point, she joined in a hospital research project about terminal patients, recording her daily thoughts and actions on tape, as she had no typing skills--- what we'd call a blog these days. One day the tape recorder, with the tape, was stolen, while she was in her home; she could do nothing because she was already on crutches. She contacted a local paper to help her get the tape back at least, and that's when the nation first heard of her project.

    Armed with a new tape recorder and with the support of some celebrities, including John Denver, who heard of her plight, Jacquelyn continued to record, and wrote poetry as well. One of the poems was the basis of the song "Sunshine", which Denver set to music.

    The cancer soon spread to her lungs, and she had to be taken to the hospital on November 7, 1971. She died 3 days later, aged 20. Her 2nd husband, Tom, sang "Take Me Home, Country Roads" at the funeral, which was also attended by her first husband, who had never gotten over her. (He was, according to Tom's former bandmate, also on the run, having gone AWOL in the Vietnam period.) Jacquelyn was cremated and her ashes scattered in the Rocky Mountains.

    Soon afterward, the book "SUNSHINE" by Naomi Klein came out, and in 1973, the TV movie starring Cristina Raines and Cliff DeYoung, with the Greenbush twins of the later "Little House on the Prairie" playing the little daughter.

    Another TV Movie made a couple of years later, "MESSAGE FOR MY DAUGHTER", starring Martin Sheen, Bonnie Bedelia, and Kitty Wynn, was loosely based on the original concept. This, however concerned a "sequel" of sorts, where the now-grown, unhappy daughter (Wynn) is given her mother's (Bedelia) tapes by her stepfather (Sheen) in an effort to reconcile father, daughter, and the memory of the mother she barely knew.

    The original film spawned a sequel Christmas movie with DeYoung and a short-lived TV series about the widower and his stepdaughter.

    Jacquelyn Helton's Findagrave entry is here:

    http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=22944291

    For some interesting insights and memories, here is the IMDB site for the specific SUNSHINE film. Her husband''s band mate posted some reminiscences that give insight into her chracter and perhaps unfortunate choice to not amputate.

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070751/
    Last edited by Linnie; 06-05-2009 at 11:24 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    So. California
    Posts
    1,886
    Wow how sad. I was 9 years old in 1971 so I don't recall this story. I had know idea that she was the one who actually wrote the song "Sunshine" that John Denver sings. Thanks for posting this.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    South America
    Posts
    604
    Sad story...I wonder whatever happened to the daughter.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,411
    A very sad story indeed.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    325
    Jacquelyn Helton's Findagrave entry is here:

    http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=22944291
    The real woman was far more beautiful than the actress who played her.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1

    maiden name

    [QUOTEher maiden name was boyle and her first husbands name was vernon...she was a very special girl who had a great respect for everything around her..I dot condone what she did but i respect the hell out of it because she lived and died by her own rules and that takes a lot of courage.=Linnie;795498]The recent thread about "Trinidad", the cancer-stricken girl who fatally delayed treatment for the sake of her pregnancy, brought this lady back to my mind, almost 40 years after her untimely death.

    Many of a certain age (including of course myself) will remember the heyday of made-for-TV movies back in the early 1970s. Some of these movies explored some formerly taboo topics in an edgy attempt at pushing the envelope of the G-rated format, and some were about young cancer victims. One of the most memorable and, in some opinions, among the best of these--- right up there with BRIAN'S SONG--- was the story of a young doomed mother who gained a brief fame for recording her thoughts for her then-toddler daughter. This was based on a series of articles, and then a book, SUNSHINE, written shortly before and after her death in 1971.

    Jacquelyn "Lynn" Marie Helton (one thing I can't find is her maiden name, and it's been years since I read or even saw the book) was a teenaged bride who gave birth to her only child, Jennifer, in 1969 at age 18. Soon after, she and her first husband parted, and she quickly met, fell in love with, and married a young musician named Tom Helton, who also adopted her daughter.
    During this period, Jacquelyn had received the terrible news that she had a rare form of bone cancer. She and her new husband had been living in Wyoming, where they both performed with a local band, The Lowe Brothers, that was gaining some notice. Her condition forced them to move to Denver, Colorado to be near the best treatment center at the time.

    She was offered the option of amputation of one of her legs to halt the cancer's spread, but there were no guarantees, and she was reluctant to become so mutilated and helpless, if it might be futile anyway. Other treatments were tried, but she suffered greatly, as cancer patients still suffer, and often die today.

    At that point, she joined in a hospital research project about terminal patients, recording her daily thoughts and actions on tape, as she had no typing skills--- what we'd call a blog these days. One day the tape recorder, with the tape, was stolen, while she was in her home; she could do nothing because she was already on crutches. She contacted a local paper to help her get the tape back at least, and that's when the nation first heard of her project.

    Armed with a new tape recorder and with the support of some celebrities, including John Denver, who heard of her plight, Jacquelyn continued to record, and wrote poetry as well. One of the poems was the basis of the song "Sunshine", which Denver set to music.

    The cancer soon spread to her lungs, and she had to be taken to the hospital on November 7, 1971. She died 3 days later, aged 20. Her 2nd husband, Tom, sang "Take Me Home, Country Roads" at the funeral, which was also attended by her first husband, who had never gotten over her. (He was, according to Tom's former bandmate, also on the run, having gone AWOL in the Vietnam period.) Jacquelyn was cremated and her ashes scattered in the Rocky Mountains.

    Soon afterward, the book "SUNSHINE" by Naomi Klein came out, and in 1973, the TV movie starring Cristina Raines and Cliff DeYoung, with the Greenbush twins of the later "Little House on the Prairie" playing the little daughter.

    Another TV Movie made a couple of years later, "MESSAGE FOR MY DAUGHTER", starring Martin Sheen, Bonnie Bedelia, and Kitty Wynn, was loosely based on the original concept. This, however concerned a "sequel" of sorts, where the now-grown, unhappy daughter (Wynn) is given her mother's (Bedelia) tapes by her stepfather (Sheen) in an effort to reconcile father, daughter, and the memory of the mother she barely knew.

    The original film spawned a sequel Christmas movie with DeYoung and a short-lived TV series about the widower and his stepdaughter.

    Jacquelyn Helton's Findagrave entry is here:

    http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=22944291

    For some interesting insights and memories, here is the IMDB site for the specific SUNSHINE film. Her husband''s band mate posted some reminiscences that give insight into her chracter and perhaps unfortunate choice to not amputate.

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070751/[/QUOTE]

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Northwest Ohio
    Posts
    3,251
    Cried my eyes out over this movie a zillion years ago.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    967
    I have seen both movies, and they are very touching.
    "Why don't they make the whole plane out of that black box stuff"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,680
    I remember this well. I saw "Sunshine" and I still have the book, if you can believe it!
    Everyone must die but not everyone has lived


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Linnie View Post
    The recent thread about "Trinidad", the cancer-stricken girl who fatally delayed treatment for the sake of her pregnancy, brought this lady back to my mind, almost 40 years after her untimely death.

    Many of a certain age (including of course myself) will remember the heyday of made-for-TV movies back in the early 1970s. Some of these movies explored some formerly taboo topics in an edgy attempt at pushing the envelope of the G-rated format, and some were about young cancer victims. One of the most memorable and, in some opinions, among the best of these--- right up there with BRIAN'S SONG--- was the story of a young doomed mother who gained a brief fame for recording her thoughts for her then-toddler daughter. This was based on a series of articles, and then a book, SUNSHINE, written shortly before and after her death in 1971.

    Jacquelyn "Lynn" Marie Helton (one thing I can't find is her maiden name, and it's been years since I read or even saw the book) was a teenaged bride who gave birth to her only child, Jennifer, in 1969 at age 18. Soon after, she and her first husband parted, and she quickly met, fell in love with, and married a young musician named Tom Helton, who also adopted her daughter.
    During this period, Jacquelyn had received the terrible news that she had a rare form of bone cancer. She and her new husband had been living in Wyoming, where they both performed with a local band, The Lowe Brothers, that was gaining some notice. Her condition forced them to move to Denver, Colorado to be near the best treatment center at the time.

    She was offered the option of amputation of one of her legs to halt the cancer's spread, but there were no guarantees, and she was reluctant to become so mutilated and helpless, if it might be futile anyway. Other treatments were tried, but she suffered greatly, as cancer patients still suffer, and often die today.

    At that point, she joined in a hospital research project about terminal patients, recording her daily thoughts and actions on tape, as she had no typing skills--- what we'd call a blog these days. One day the tape recorder, with the tape, was stolen, while she was in her home; she could do nothing because she was already on crutches. She contacted a local paper to help her get the tape back at least, and that's when the nation first heard of her project.

    Armed with a new tape recorder and with the support of some celebrities, including John Denver, who heard of her plight, Jacquelyn continued to record, and wrote poetry as well. One of the poems was the basis of the song "Sunshine", which Denver set to music.

    The cancer soon spread to her lungs, and she had to be taken to the hospital on November 7, 1971. She died 3 days later, aged 20. Her 2nd husband, Tom, sang "Take Me Home, Country Roads" at the funeral, which was also attended by her first husband, who had never gotten over her. (He was, according to Tom's former bandmate, also on the run, having gone AWOL in the Vietnam period.) Jacquelyn was cremated and her ashes scattered in the Rocky Mountains.

    Soon afterward, the book "SUNSHINE" by Naomi Klein came out, and in 1973, the TV movie starring Cristina Raines and Cliff DeYoung, with the Greenbush twins of the later "Little House on the Prairie" playing the little daughter.

    Another TV Movie made a couple of years later, "MESSAGE FOR MY DAUGHTER", starring Martin Sheen, Bonnie Bedelia, and Kitty Wynn, was loosely based on the original concept. This, however concerned a "sequel" of sorts, where the now-grown, unhappy daughter (Wynn) is given her mother's (Bedelia) tapes by her stepfather (Sheen) in an effort to reconcile father, daughter, and the memory of the mother she barely knew.

    The original film spawned a sequel Christmas movie with DeYoung and a short-lived TV series about the widower and his stepdaughter.

    Jacquelyn Helton's Findagrave entry is here:

    http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=22944291

    For some interesting insights and memories, here is the IMDB site for the specific SUNSHINE film. Her husband''s band mate posted some reminiscences that give insight into her chracter and perhaps unfortunate choice to not amputate.

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070751/

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    2
    I have heard John Denver describe why he wrote the song Sunshine. His account never mentioned Jacqueline. And I have never heard him or anyone associated with him confirm this either. Im wondering where you saw this and if there is any way to verify your statement. I would really like to know if this is accurate or not. Of course this would really change the meaning of this song. And I have never heard him refer to her when he talked about writing it. Im familiar with the movie, I saw it when I was ten and always remembered it. I just watched it on youtube. To my understanding she was a fan of Johns and they used his music in the movie but it wasn't written for her specifically. If you have anyway to verify your statement please let me know where I can find this information. I would really appreciate it very much. Thank you, Susan

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2,092
    According to the IMDB poster named Jim Lowe, who claimed to be a member of the Tom and Lynn's band. The posts are still there and while I cannot verify them myself, they appear to be on the level for IMDB postings. I don't believe Denver plagiarized the poems or suchlike, but he was acquainted with the situation as were other then-famous people, and his songs were used at her service and all over the movie. "Sunshine" the song was in heavy rotation on the Top 40.
    Actually I don't care much for it, m'self-- it's too long and lugubrious, and people made some fun of its cloying sentimentality (along with "Annie's Song"), which I suspect was Denver's major contribution, much as I loved the heck out of his music and miss him madly.
    They had articles about Mrs. Helton all the way in our local CT paper which I remember, about her tapes, death, and then about the TV movie. It was a departure for the usual attitude in those days towards terminally-ill people, young or old, was out of sight, out of mind whenever possible.

    (I did not see my own grandfather the last year of his life while he was dying of cancer circa 1970; He lived most of that year in hospitals and nursing facilities which did not permit visits by children under 16. This was common.)
    Last edited by Linnie; 10-15-2011 at 02:04 AM.

  13. #13

    Lyn Helton -- And the country road not taken.

    Jacquelyn (Lyn) Marie Helton, a heart wrenching story of dying young.

    I remember watching the movie ďSunshineĒ when it first aired in 1973. Being only a year and a half older that her when she passed, I could truly relate to a life cut short. So much undone, so little of life experienced made me; and I am sure many others; ponder their own mortality. Life and death is indeed, unfair. We are all subjected to this. You, me, the Kennedy brothers, Martin Luther King Jr., the four students killed at Kent State on May 4 of 1970 and the countless young men who didnít come home from Viet Nam. This wasnít just Lynís story, itís theirs and countless others whose names we do not know.

    Like everyone else, I cried many tears as Lynís life slipped away and her husband and young daughter had to carry on without her. I think part of this had to do with the fact that she seamed to have finally found the happiness she truly desired, a beautiful little daughter and a man whom she loved and in return loved her back. Some of my sorrow I am sure also stemmed from the knowledge that she was not a member of a minority. As stated above, dying young is a common occurrence.

    I will admit that I only saw the movie once, never viewed the two that followed and had no idea that a very short lived television series followed. I have not read the book or anything else written on her or her family. In short, she vanished from my mind like a put of smoke, untilÖ.last week. Donít ask, as I have no idea why she would suddenly come to mind.

    For the past few days I have been attempting to learn anything I can about her, her very short life and what happened to her family. This is going to be a very lean obsession as there is little to discover. Considering the coverage her life and death generated just before and not long after her passing, I find this a bit of a surprise. Oh, of course her surviving family values their privacy; and that is to be expected; but if you examine what they were willing to bring forth to the general public at the time, it is somewhat curious.

    Mind you now, with what I am about to say, I am not attempting to minimize Lynís death. All loss of life brings grief to those around them, and that should always be respected. But for the most part it usually only centers on a relatively small circle of friends and family. In Lynís case she was not an astronaut killed in a mishap or a heart surgeon saving lives. She didnít march off to a foreign country to fight for people she didnít know or make contact with aliens. She was a child that wasnít old enough to drink or vote, who married twice and had an 18 month old toddler. She died from a disease that kills thousands in this country every year, and leaves behind shattered lives that are changed for ever. So I had to ask myself, what is it that is different about her? Well, nothing. Oh yeah, there is the publicity, along with the films and a book that somebody made money from. Frank Sinatra got in to the mix with a nice donation to Jill/Jennifer for her well being and I gather a college education. It was a story that was hot until it just wasnít any more, and the principal characters vanished into obscurity as if they too had passed in to the beauty that is death that Lyn so embraced.
    Having realized this in my journey to understand Lyn Helton, I began to try to unravel what little I could discover with what little I had to work with. I ended up with more questions than answers but I think I can honestly say that Lyn might have been courageous but I think if a closer look is taken, one might notice that her strength was in dyingÖnot living.

    Personally I hope that when my time comes I will be as brave as she was. That was much to her credit and might have been one of the reasons I cried the way I did when I saw the movie. But with all she loved or said she loved, with all she wanted and hoped for and dreamed for, she quit. She gave up. She did not fight the good fight. She did not push the envelope. She left her husband and daughter too early, and if all she got out of having her leg amputated was another year or maybe twoÖ.well, thatís another year or two. Thatís more time to talk into a tape recorder, more time to take pictures, write poems, sing songs and paint with water colors at the kitchen table with her beloved child. It might have given her the time she needed to tell Jennifer bed-time stories, splash in the bathtub, teacher her letters, numbers, shapes and colors. Who knows, maybe she could have watch her go to her first Kindergarten class and proudly display her art work on the refrigerator. You know normal mommy things. But it seems that Lyn didnít want that without a guarantee that it would continue to continue. Perhaps someone should have told her that no one has that, sick or well. Life is a grand crap shoot for everyone. Anyone of us can walk out the door in the morning and not be home for dinner.

    Maybe at 20 she could not grasp that concept. Maybe when I saw the movie at 23 I didnít get it either. But I would like to think that the doctors she felt were running her life and controlling her destiny might have thought to mention this. Could someone not have pointed out that in keeping her leg the only definite thing that was in her life was death, and it wasnít too far off. Removing it most likely would have given her more time. More time to love, more time to live, and more time to create memories that were real and spoken and not on a tape that can be stolen, misplaced or damaged. If fact if they did catch it in time she might still be alive now. Teddy Kennedyís son had bone cancer and had to have his leg removed in 1973. He is still with us, married with children and living a normal life. I am not saying that Lynís case was exactly the same, but it seems to be running a pretty close second right down to the time in history.

    I could be way off target here but it looks to me like she chose to show everyone how to be brave in leaving as opposed to having the strength to stay. I wonder if Jennifer thinks her mother made the best most loving unselfish decision.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    6
    http://www.facebook.com/groups/34167944178/ This facebook page has a lot of information on the movie Sunshine and Jacquelyn Helton for anyone who is interested.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    South Surrey, BC
    Posts
    957
    Quote Originally Posted by Linnie View Post
    Soon afterward, the book "SUNSHINE" by Naomi Klein came out, and in 1973, the TV movie starring Cristina Raines and Cliff DeYoung, with the Greenbush twins of the later "Little House on the Prairie" playing the little daughter.
    The book was written by Norma Klein, who I believe is not related.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    WI
    Posts
    474
    Quote Originally Posted by Pooh-Bear View Post
    Jacquelyn (Lyn) Marie Helton, a heart wrenching story of dying young.

    I remember watching the movie “Sunshine” when it first aired in 1973. Being only a year and a half older that her when she passed, I could truly relate to a life cut short. So much undone, so little of life experienced made me; and I am sure many others; ponder their own mortality. Life and death is indeed, unfair. We are all subjected to this. You, me, the Kennedy brothers, Martin Luther King Jr., the four students killed at Kent State on May 4 of 1970 and the countless young men who didn’t come home from Viet Nam. This wasn’t just Lyn’s story, it’s theirs and countless others whose names we do not know.

    Like everyone else, I cried many tears as Lyn’s life slipped away and her husband and young daughter had to carry on without her. I think part of this had to do with the fact that she seamed to have finally found the happiness she truly desired, a beautiful little daughter and a man whom she loved and in return loved her back. Some of my sorrow I am sure also stemmed from the knowledge that she was not a member of a minority. As stated above, dying young is a common occurrence.

    I will admit that I only saw the movie once, never viewed the two that followed and had no idea that a very short lived television series followed. I have not read the book or anything else written on her or her family. In short, she vanished from my mind like a put of smoke, until….last week. Don’t ask, as I have no idea why she would suddenly come to mind.

    For the past few days I have been attempting to learn anything I can about her, her very short life and what happened to her family. This is going to be a very lean obsession as there is little to discover. Considering the coverage her life and death generated just before and not long after her passing, I find this a bit of a surprise. Oh, of course her surviving family values their privacy; and that is to be expected; but if you examine what they were willing to bring forth to the general public at the time, it is somewhat curious.

    Mind you now, with what I am about to say, I am not attempting to minimize Lyn’s death. All loss of life brings grief to those around them, and that should always be respected. But for the most part it usually only centers on a relatively small circle of friends and family. In Lyn’s case she was not an astronaut killed in a mishap or a heart surgeon saving lives. She didn’t march off to a foreign country to fight for people she didn’t know or make contact with aliens. She was a child that wasn’t old enough to drink or vote, who married twice and had an 18 month old toddler. She died from a disease that kills thousands in this country every year, and leaves behind shattered lives that are changed for ever. So I had to ask myself, what is it that is different about her? Well, nothing. Oh yeah, there is the publicity, along with the films and a book that somebody made money from. Frank Sinatra got in to the mix with a nice donation to Jill/Jennifer for her well being and I gather a college education. It was a story that was hot until it just wasn’t any more, and the principal characters vanished into obscurity as if they too had passed in to the beauty that is death that Lyn so embraced.
    Having realized this in my journey to understand Lyn Helton, I began to try to unravel what little I could discover with what little I had to work with. I ended up with more questions than answers but I think I can honestly say that Lyn might have been courageous but I think if a closer look is taken, one might notice that her strength was in dying…not living.

    Personally I hope that when my time comes I will be as brave as she was. That was much to her credit and might have been one of the reasons I cried the way I did when I saw the movie. But with all she loved or said she loved, with all she wanted and hoped for and dreamed for, she quit. She gave up. She did not fight the good fight. She did not push the envelope. She left her husband and daughter too early, and if all she got out of having her leg amputated was another year or maybe two….well, that’s another year or two. That’s more time to talk into a tape recorder, more time to take pictures, write poems, sing songs and paint with water colors at the kitchen table with her beloved child. It might have given her the time she needed to tell Jennifer bed-time stories, splash in the bathtub, teacher her letters, numbers, shapes and colors. Who knows, maybe she could have watch her go to her first Kindergarten class and proudly display her art work on the refrigerator. You know normal mommy things. But it seems that Lyn didn’t want that without a guarantee that it would continue to continue. Perhaps someone should have told her that no one has that, sick or well. Life is a grand crap shoot for everyone. Anyone of us can walk out the door in the morning and not be home for dinner.

    Maybe at 20 she could not grasp that concept. Maybe when I saw the movie at 23 I didn’t get it either. But I would like to think that the doctors she felt were running her life and controlling her destiny might have thought to mention this. Could someone not have pointed out that in keeping her leg the only definite thing that was in her life was death, and it wasn’t too far off. Removing it most likely would have given her more time. More time to love, more time to live, and more time to create memories that were real and spoken and not on a tape that can be stolen, misplaced or damaged. If fact if they did catch it in time she might still be alive now. Teddy Kennedy’s son had bone cancer and had to have his leg removed in 1973. He is still with us, married with children and living a normal life. I am not saying that Lyn’s case was exactly the same, but it seems to be running a pretty close second right down to the time in history.

    I could be way off target here but it looks to me like she chose to show everyone how to be brave in leaving as opposed to having the strength to stay. I wonder if Jennifer thinks her mother made the best most loving unselfish decision.
    That's a very good post, I agree with your assessment.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2,092
    Look what I just found--- an article Lyn Helton wrote, in Rotarian Magazine (which published it shortly after her death.) She goes into some of her reasoning behind the treatments she chose, and there's a good photo of her with her daughter. Article starts on Page 21.

    http://books.google.com/books?id=0jU...helton&f=false

    There are several good articles there about death by prominent authors, so this was a singular distinction. Ironically, she was much closer to death than the much older people who contributed. (Indeed one, ray Bradbury, is still hanging in there at age 92!)

    Her Findagrave entry has also been enriched. There are now several snapshots and a scan of the original article that I recall reading.
    Last edited by Linnie; 04-05-2012 at 10:36 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •