Results 1 to 38 of 38

Thread: Mummies of the World Exhibit

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Corralitos, Cal
    Posts
    6,997

    Mummies of the World Exhibit

    You must watch "Italy's Mummies" this Saturday at 4pm on the National Geographic channel.

    It looks like the vatican finally took a large chill pill and let some scientists in to study these bundles of joy.

    A very interesting show.
    Last edited by Nelliebean; 08-26-2009 at 08:57 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    6,124

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Corralitos, Cal
    Posts
    6,997
    Quote Originally Posted by NOVSTORM View Post
    Good post..thanks
    Thanks Novstorm. I've always been facinated by mummies.
    It's amazing how well preserved some of them are.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    San Antonio
    Posts
    1,335
    Thanks !! DVR is set !

  5. #5
    Guest Guest
    Sounds cool. Thanks for the heads-up!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    149
    well, d**k balls, I don't get that channel....that sucks
    "Ever thine, ever mine, ever ours" - Ludwig van Beethoven

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    1,230
    Quote Originally Posted by Tripfaceape View Post
    well, d**k balls, I don't get that channel....that sucks
    ~Sigh~ me either


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    149
    Quote Originally Posted by TallulahDahling View Post
    ~Sigh~ me either
    lol damn my basic cable!!!
    "Ever thine, ever mine, ever ours" - Ludwig van Beethoven

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    thatta way ---->
    Posts
    5,972
    Very interesting... I wish I could watch it. However-

    They should give them back. I can understand wanting to study them and find out about their history. But, when I read the title of this thread I really did suddenly think that Rome had learned this practice from the Egyptians... Duh.

    They have no business keeping those. They aren't theirs and don't belong to them. I'm still pissed that they used them to make paper with. I'm so sick of people disrespecting them. Rrrrr

    ♥♥♥

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Seattle---Rain City---
    Posts
    1,327
    Damn! I don't get that channel either!! I wish I could just pick the channels I wanted and pay for them! LOL!

    When life hands you tequila, make a margarita.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    12,281
    I totally missed this thread. Here's hoping it is available on Nat Geo In Demand.
    Quote Originally Posted by stacebabe View Post
    The only reason I watched the entire thing was because I was wondering who the middle aged lesbian white woman was in the house full of Armenians. Then I found out it was Bruce Jenner.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Tulsa, OK.
    Posts
    4,807
    Wonder if it will get on netflix?
    Death Hags Unite

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Corralitos, Cal
    Posts
    6,997

    Mummies of the World Exhibit

    These are mummies from a cholera outbreak in Mexico 1833.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/quintes/2627273021/

    Click on the right side for more pictures.
    Last edited by Nelliebean; 08-31-2009 at 10:23 PM.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    6,551
    bad link?

    "To everything - turn, turn, turn...
    There is a season - turn, turn, turn...
    And a time for every purpose under heaven."

    - The Byrds

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Corralitos, Cal
    Posts
    6,997
    Quote Originally Posted by RubySlippers View Post
    bad link?
    No. Just my lousy typing.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    thatta way ---->
    Posts
    5,972
    Quote Originally Posted by Nelliebean View Post
    These are mummies from a cholera outbreak in Mexico 1833.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/quintes/2627273021/

    Click on the right side for more pictures.
    This is absolutely fascinating! Thank you Nellie for posting this. Never heard of them before.

    Now I have another reason to go to Mexico.

    That first photo you posted looks terrifying!
    ♥♥♥

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Corralitos, Cal
    Posts
    6,997
    You are welcome!

    When I was a kid I called mummies the Phyllo dough people.

    I've always found them interesting.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    5,307
    Awesome

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    2,402

    The Mystery of Germany's Aristocratic Mummies

    When they died, Germany noble families of the 18th century did what the Egyptians had done before them: They had themselves mummified. As an increasing number of such well-preserved corpses are found, scientists are trying to find out why.

    Baron von Holz had a difficult lot. During the Thirty Years' War, von Holz fought in the Swedish army as a mercenary, but he was not granted a hero's death on the battlefield. He was cut down, rather less heroically, at the age of 35 by either the flu or blood poisoning. And it was only in death, that his situation really improved.
    His family dressed his mortal remains in precious calf-leather boots with nailed soles. The warrior was then laid out in a kind of luxury crypt under the castle of Sommersdorf near Ansbach, in modern-day Bavaria. In those vaults von Holz's corpse was privileged with an honor previously reserved primarily for Egyptian pharaohs: His body did not decompose.
    More than 370 years after his untimely death, the nobleman still lies in his casket, well preserved. Von Holz was a giant of a man, standing 1.80 meters (around 5'10"), at a time when most humans were far shorter. To this day, his feet are still shod in those smart leather boots that his clan had made for him almost four centuries ago.
    Secrets of Mummification
    The corpse recently left its burial place in the castle cellar for the very first time so that archeologists from the Reiss Engelhorn Museums in Mannheim could take a close look at the mummy. It quickly became clear that the boot-clad baron had no external injuries and he seems to have been in excellent health when he contracted his fatal infection. What remains unclear is why the aristocratic soldier's body was mummified in the first place.
    Only a handful of scientists take an active interest in the leathery corpses that are recovered from boggy moorlands or cellar vaults in Germany. Every few months, a baron, or a priest, turns up at archeologist Wilfried Rosendahl's door to report that he has found a corpse under his castle or in his parish church.
    Confronted with the ever-increasing number of new discoveries, Rosendahl concedes that: "We are more familiar with the history of the Egyptian mummies than with the bodies slumbering in our tombs."
    Only a few weeks ago, the researcher discovered the superbly preserved bodies of 12 members of an aristocratic family in the district of Illereichen in southern Germany.
    Why did German Nobility Dabble in Mummification?
    Rosendahl's colleague Andreas Ströbl is currently examining the remains of an 18th-century nobleman's clan that was laid to rest in a cellar grave under the 18th century Church of St. John the Baptist in Hannover. "We've known that these aristocrats' crypts existed, but for a long time we didn't know why," Ströbl admits.
    About 1,000 mummified bodies in German noblemen's graves have been discovered and cataloged so far. The vaults contain children as well as adults, their clothes are sometimes still in remarkably good condition. Often the tombs also contain burial objects: Combs, spices, coins, and in one case, a shaving brush.
    The surprizing number of tombs containing mummified remains leads researchers to the conclusion that it was not random. "For a long time, I believed that mummification was more of an accidental corollary of the way people were buried in those days," Ströbl says. New evidence suggests something different: In this early modern period did many of the rich and aristocratic deliberately have themselves buried in this way so that their remains would be preserved?
    A Mausoleum with Ancient Air Conditioning
    There is scant source material -- but Ströbl did find a "smoking gun": In a letter, written in 1710, to the board of the parish church of Berlin, a woman called Catharina Steinkoppen made a request for her deceased granddaughter. Namely, that "the aforementioned corpse should not decay in the vaults below the church." The girl's father -- a courtier by the name of von Schütz -- offered the stately sum of 10 Reichsthalers, the equivalent of a year's wages for a coachman, for the service.
    A total of 140 mummified bodies lie in a crypt below a church near Alexanderplatz in central Berlin. It has been known for some time that this was the exclusive domain of deceased members of rich or highly respected families. But the fact that church leaders in Berlin deliberately set up the biggest mausoleum in Germany is a more recent discovery.
    After the discovery of the grandmother's petition, researchers examined the nobleman's crypt in the historic center of Berlin. What they found was an extremely effective ventilation system running through the tomb. All the burial chambers were connected to each other by a series of small shafts. As such this underground graveyard was always well ventilated.
    Indeed Rosendahl and Ströbl found cleverly conceived ventilation systems in even the smallest of these basement graves. But that wasn't the only trick that promoted mummification. The undertakers lined the coffins of the departed with sawdust which then soaked up any fluids that leaked out of the body.
    Last edited by geekygirl; 06-19-2010 at 12:02 AM.
    Any day above ground is a good day.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    2,402

    Part 2

    Part 2: Embalming in Time For Judgment day

    Over the course of time though, many of the carefully created burial sites were destroyed by careless construction work. On more than one occasion, unsuspecting builders bricked up important ventilation shafts. In addition, to deter plunderers and grave robbers many churches bolted shut the windows of their crypts. Often enough, that sealed the fate of these historic tombs. Once the cross ventilation was cut off, the mummies began to rot within weeks.
    But archeologists are still at a loss to explain why Germany's rich had themselves mummified in the first place. There is, however, one potential clue: Up to 99 percent of the crypt mummies have been found in areas of the country that were Protestant. The finds so far have been in Franconia, Saxony, Thuringia, Brandenburg, northern Germany, and Berlin.
    Reiner Sörries, the head of the Museum of Sepulchral Culture in Kassel, is making the first attempts to explain the mystery. Sörries is one of the few archeologists in Germany who studies burial culture. He suspects that religious reformer Martin Luther may have triggered the trend for mummification in the modern age. By way of proof, Sörries cites a passage in the Book of Job that Luther translated into common German: "I know that my Redeemer lives, and that in the end he will stand upon the earth. And after my skin has been destroyed, yet in my flesh, I will see God."
    Maybe wealthy protestants chose this method of mummification out of fear that they might not rise up and go to heaven if their mortal remains rotted away? "There are still many gaps that we can't fill in," Sörries admits. "It is conceivable that people simply wanted to play it safe and preserve their bodies until Judgment Day."
    Computer Reconstructions of Dead Nobility
    Whatever the answer, superstition undoubtedly played a role. Bereaved families often sealed the coffins of their departed loved ones to prevent the dead rising up. There was fear that zombies could climb out of their crypts and attack the living.
    The group of scientists working with Sörries, Rosendahl and Ströbl now wants to look closer at the bizarre burial rite. This involves researching how the mummified dead actually lived. Using computer tomography, the researchers constructed an image of the late Baron von Holz' face. From this, one sees that the tall warrior must have cut quite a formidable figure. He had the angular skull of a rugby player and remarkably healthy teeth for the period.
    Ströbl hopes to be able to come up with similar insights into a potentially criminal case he unearthed in a family tomb in the Wettenbergen neighborhood in Hannover, which mainly contains members of two aristocratic families, von Hansing and von Grone. Strangely, four daughters in one of the families died in four consecutive years. Had the daughters of this household fallen victim to a virus in their youth? Or was it a case of murder? An analysis of the four girls' internal organs should provide information that could answer this question.
    Mummies in Perfectly Preserved Period Costume
    Another fascinating insight into the bygone era is provided by 29 very well preserved mummies found in a vault under the church of the Benedictine abbey in the town of Riesa, in the eastern German state of Saxony. Experts consider the church's crypt a unique historical testament to mummification in Germany. Construction work last fall drew the researchers' attention to the aristocratic tomb.
    While the region was still part of what was formerly communist East Germany, the bare minimum of preservation work was done on the site. Now, however, the local church council is embroiled in a dispute about what to do with this cultural monument. Some want the crypt, which is only accessible down a narrow stairway, opened up to tourists. But the majority of councilors want to put tight restrictions on public entry.
    The site is unique for the look it provides at the authentic period costumes worn by wealthy citizens in past centuries. One girl, for instance, is wearing a perfectly preserved silk dress and has a bonnet on her head. Other bodies were adorned with nightcaps, pointed caps, and long robes.
    The identity of the 29 corpses is relatively certain. Uncertainty surrounds only the most famous of the crypt's inhabitants, who may or may not be Ernst Otto Innocenz, Baron von Odeleben, a Saxon officer with close ties to Napoleon.
    In 1812, Odeleben supported the French general's ill-fated Russian campaign, which ended in a fiasco. Subsequently, Odeleben also witnessed the routing of the French army near Leipzig.
    Genetic analysis is being used to help clear up this mystery. But in contrast to Baron von Holz, the researchers won't be looking for battle scars that may have led to his death. The war veteran spent the last decades of his life working as a land surveyor, and he passed away at his desk.
    Translated from the German by Jan Liebelt
    Any day above ground is a good day.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    2,402
    Warning -- Link to Death Pics. Not gruesome, just mummified remains.

    http://www.spiegel.de/fotostrecke/fo...cke-56040.html

    The most fascinating picture is that of a computer reconstruction from the remains belonging to Baron von Holz. They were able to show what he looked like. Very much like someone you would see on the streets today.

    http://www.spiegel.de/fotostrecke/fo...e-56040-4.html
    Any day above ground is a good day.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Middle Earth
    Posts
    12,181
    Beef jerky sounds good right about now.
    Do not go gentle into that good night.
    Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light......Dylan Thomas

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    2,402
    Quote Originally Posted by cleanskull View Post
    Beef jerky sounds good right about now.
    I suppose that would be tastier than the Wienerschnitzel.
    Any day above ground is a good day.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Nunya Bidness
    Posts
    10,720
    Great post! I'm going to repost it on FB so my fam can see that! (My uncle lived in Germany for 16 years.)

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    923

    Mummies of the World Exhibit

    On Saturday my Hubby and I took our nephew to an Exhibit here in Charlotte called "Mummies of the world".

    It was really quite interesting, they wouldn't let you take any photos inside the exhibit, but I am posting a link with some pictures:

    http://www.mummiesoftheworld.com/

    I thought some of you hags in the area might be interested. Most of the mummies are from Egypt, but there are also some from Germany and other European countries. There are some bodies that were just naturally mummified and they still have hair! One woman was buried in a seated position and you could still see the tattoo's above her breasts and on her chin. It really was quite fascinating.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    WI
    Posts
    2,122
    I saw it in Milwaukee- it was pretty good.

    The ones I remember most are the woman who was sitting up and the family- a husband, wife and child. It was really moving.

    We currently have a Cleopatra exhibit going on but I haven't seen it yet.
    Performing my signature monkey hump move since 10/16/2007...

    RIP Dad- 11/14/1947 to 12/16/2013

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    923
    The only ones that really bothered me were the more recent ones, they had the woman and soldier that were accidentally mummified, something about them made the hair on the back of my neck stand up. Loved it though, Cleopatra exhibit sounds interesting too, I am a museum nerd

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    OK - where bows and arrows are broken
    Posts
    1,784

    Manfred Bajorat - Found Mummified at Sea

    This man was found mummified in his cabin near Manilla. No distress call was sent out and he had not been heard from for over a year.

    Warning: Graphic Dead Photo
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/wo...-a6904011.html
    In Loving Memory of Timothy Houdek, October 22, 1969 - January 8, 2013

    My awesome dad: Harry Houdek, September 8, 1933 - November 20, 2013

    Words can't convey how much I miss you both. RIP with love.




  29. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,814
    Great find!

    Just an observation though - how was the guy supposed to send out a distress call? He looks stiff as a board.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    San Diego CA
    Posts
    3,789
    I am thinking he died of a heart attack and couldn't send a message, or was trying to as his body was found right there with the handset near by .
    "An Ye Harm None, Do What Ye Will" ~From the Wiccan Rede~


  31. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    OK - where bows and arrows are broken
    Posts
    1,784
    Quote Originally Posted by JimC View Post
    Great find!

    Just an observation though - how was the guy supposed to send out a distress call? He looks stiff as a board.
    Thanks, Jim! That's part of the mystery. As Pks mentioned, maybe he had the phone in his hand about to make the call when the ailment overtook him (stroke or heart attack). They did say it was natural causes, but nothing more than that (leaving death hags 'round the world frustrated for sure!).

    My big question is the timeframe of death. The picture was absolutely riveting which lead to a bit of great death hag reading in the night. One page said that he hadn't been heard from in about a year and even that was online in a sailor's enthusiasts website. Yet another page said he'd been dead roughly 4 days. In the picture it looks like he's been dead more than 4 days, but in my opinion there's not a year's worth of decomposition there. Maybe someone else can come aboard (horrible pun fully intended!) and maybe fine tune the date of death?

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    BTown, Baby
    Posts
    33,275
    I landed on a site before this popped up here that features quite a few mummies, including
    Vladimir Lenin (1870 - 1924) : RUSSIA, below

    18 Unbelievably Alive Dead People Who Will Scare You Silly

    Humans have always has this morbid fascination with death and the dead. Thus, they've always deemed to preserve their dead all through different ages and thousands of years. But what if the preservation was so perfect and flawless that the dead appeared to be completely alive and scare the creeps out of you. Watch out, 'cause you're in for a truly macabre experience.
    http://www.emlii.com/840424dc/18-Unbelievably-Alive-Dead-People-Who-Will-Scare-You-Silly




    Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them--Matthew 7:12


  33. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,814
    Quote Originally Posted by pkstracy View Post
    I am thinking he died of a heart attack and couldn't send a message, or was trying to as his body was found right there with the handset near by .
    Here's another story about it - same dead pic warning - that says authorities suspect a heart attack. It also says that he left a rather touching\emotional note for the wife\partner he split with so that he could travel, apparently. She died of cancer some years ago.


    Quote Originally Posted by cindyt View Post
    I landed on a site before this popped up here that features quite a few mummies, including
    Vladimir Lenin (1870 - 1924) : RUSSIA, below

    18 Unbelievably Alive Dead People Who Will Scare You Silly

    http://www.emlii.com/840424dc/18-Unbelievably-Alive-Dead-People-Who-Will-Scare-You-Silly




    Great find Cindy!

    I have to warn you though; you're getting dangerously close to going off topic here - this thread is about dead and mummified German Sea Captains surrounded by mystery; not just general purpose, mummified remains.

    You might want to ask a mod to move this post to one of the General Purpose Mummified Remains threads.

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    BTown, Baby
    Posts
    33,275
    So noted. I found several mummie threads that i merged. Thanks, JimC. BTW, please merge your last two posts. That link on the last one doesn't work either.
    Last edited by cindyt; 03-02-2016 at 07:42 PM.
    Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them--Matthew 7:12


  35. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,814
    Quote Originally Posted by cindyt View Post
    So noted. I found several mummie threads that i merged. Thanks, JimC. BTW, please merge your last two posts. That link on the last one doesn't work either.
    Damn - we're taking things a tad seriously aren't we?
    I couldn't get the link to work so I deleted the post.
    Anybody else having trouble typing stuff here?

  36. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    BTown, Baby
    Posts
    33,275
    We mods didn't make the rules, but we most def enforce them and we take seriously. Move on. Fair warning.
    Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them--Matthew 7:12


  37. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    290
    We went and seen the Mummies of the World exhibit last summer. You watch a video before you go in and it states numerous times to NOT TAKE PICTURES! They feel that it is disrespectful. Ummmmm......you take them from their resting place, put them out there for the world to gawk out and that is not disrespectful??? Anywho....It was quite neat, but creepy at the same time. And yes, I felt that I was disrespectful by buying a ticket to see them, but it was worth it.

  38. #38
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    759
    I feel pretty lucky to have been able to see the mummies that the museum at Niagara Falls had. This article calls the museum "tacky" but it was one of the coolest museums I've ever been to. I was bummed when I heard it had closed.

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...oyalmummy.html

    For those who had been there you know you were able to get a pretty close up view of the mummy. There have been many things I wish I had thought to see over the years but I was glad to have been able to see these mummies once I learned who the one once was.

    You could also take all the pics you want........I took some the first time I went there around 1977 but I have no idea where they are now at.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •